• Keep Them
    Smiling

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  • We can't help everyone,
    but everyone can help
    someone.

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  • We can't help everyone,
    but everyone can help
    someone.

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  • We can't help everyone,
    but everyone can help
    someone.

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Why Epilepsy?

It is estimated that epilepsy affects 1 per cent of the population of the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that about 75 per cent of people with epilepsy can lead normal lives if properly treated. Yet despite global advances in modern medicine, epilepsy continues to be surrounded by myths and misconceptions in the Southeast Asian region. Patients with epilepsy may be taken to faith healers rather than medical doctors, and only 10-20 per cent of all patients with epilepsy receive appropriate treatment. People with epilepsy and their families have suffered ostracism by society and are deprived of treatment, leading to frequent injuries and sometimes, death. The situation is particularly bad in rural and remote areas where almost no services for epilepsy are available. The fact is that 80-90 per cent of people suffering from epilepsy, many of them children, receive no treatment at all. The physicians in developing countries make valiant efforts despite limited resources to bring state-of-the-art care to their patients.

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Timetable

Phase

One

Raise funds to establish 3 epilepsy monitoring units at LRH Hospital for Children. Ensure that the unit is ready to be staffed in a ward that is being currently renovated. Technologists and nurses will be trained to perform these duties.

June 1,2014
March 31, 2015

Phase

Two

Ensure the successful running of an independent paediatric neurology unit, fully staffed with medical personnel and nurses provided by LRH Hospital. Training of such individuals, including technologists, should be conducted through exchange programmes with the US (to include physicians, nurses, technologists). Provide support for physicians and other personnel to travel and volunteer their services.

Provide 3 additional machines - 2 for paediatric ICU care, to monitor patients in a coma, and 1 for the neonatal ICU for monitoring children in a coma who are receiving hypothermia treatment.

April 1, 2015
December 31, 2015

Phase

Three

Facilitate the transfer of knowledge to doctors by having them travel to the US for a 3-month period to train in various aspects of paediatric neurology and epilepsy (to include developing a familiarity with epilepsy surgery).

Establish facilities in LRH, including surgical equipment capable of providing surgical treatment for patients with brain tumours, congenital lesions and finally epilepsy.

January 1, 2016
June 30, 2016

Phase

Four

Establish a programme for developmentally disabled and handicapped children in collaboration with medical personnel in the US (3-month exchange programme). Many children with developmental disorders have a higher incidence of epilepsy. This is seen as a related programme for children with or without epilepsy.

January 2016
December 2017

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Rotary in Sri Lanka

Projects overview

POLIO ERADICATION

Since 1985 Rotary has led the battle against polio, and kept the pressure on as worldwide cases plummeted from 350,000 per year to several hundred. When India went off the list of endemic countries in 2012,

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SCHOOL REBUILDING

Rotary Sri Lanka was one of the first organisations that offered to participate in a massive school rebuilding effort set forth by the Sri Lanka Ministry of Education. Twenty-five schools across the country were assigned to Rotary for rebuilding.

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CANCER DETECTION

Recognising the life-saving value of screening and early detection, the Rotary Club of Colombo launched the Cancer Screening and Early Detection Project in partnership with the Ministry of Health seven years ago.

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Introduction

Dr. Sandy Para Waran is a graduate of the University of Colombo, Sri Lanka, with nearly 40 years of experience working in paediatric neurology in New York and New Jersey. With financial assistance from a grateful parent, Dr. Waran launched the first Ambulatory EEG service at the Neurodiagnostic Group of New Jersey and Overlook Hospital in 1982, followed by the first Video EEG at Overlook Hospital of Atlantic Health Systems in 1988.

In 2002, he served as Medical Director of Children’s Neurology and Epilepsy at Saint Claire’s Hospital in Denville, NJ. He was responsible for creating a six-bed Epilepsy Monitoring Unit and upgrading the paediatric unit, again with the financial assistance of a grateful family. Currently, he is collaborating with the administration of Goryeb Children’s Hospital in Morristown, NJ, to upgrade the Long Term Monitoring Unit at the facility.

Dr. Waran participated in treating children without access to private healthcare at the Epilepsy Clinic at St. Clare’s Outpatient Clinic in Dover, NJ.

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  • Dr.Waran

    Contact Dr. Waran on dr.waran@childrensneurologycenter.com

    was distinguished by New Jersey Monthly Magazine as a 2009 “Top Doc” in paediatric neurology and received the 2010 St. Claire’s Health System and Foundation Physician Humanitarian Award.

Corporate and other relevant

Information

Project Name: Project Joy

Key local Partner: Rotary Club of Colombo West

Key International Partner: Morristown Rotary Club (johnsonmerle@gmail.com)

Bankers:

Auditors: KPMG Sri Lanka

Tel: +94 777 327374

Email: larc@sltnet.lk